As I was doing some research I stumbled across a website, exclaiming #GetKidsOutLearning.  It made me think about how much time we spend learning new things and where that learning occurs. 

Children’s University states that by the time a child turns 18, they will have spent just 9% of their waking life in a classroom. So what of the remaining 91%. 

Research shows that participation in extra-curricular activities can positively impact children by building self-confidence and resilience. Research also shows that children who do not have access to these opportunities fall behind, lack confidence, and fail to develop career aspirations. The resulting attainment gap is so significant that 25% of children from the most disadvantaged backgrounds achieve below expected attainment levels. (https://www.childrensuniversity.co.uk/about-us/what-we-do-and-why/)

Every child should be given the opportunity to experience life and lessons beyond the classroom walls as a regular part of growing up. These experiences expand the horizons of young people, opening their eyes to the wonders of areas such as art, heritage, culture, adventure and the natural world. (https://www.lotc.org.uk/about/)

So what does this have to do with the New Forest Heritage Centre? Well we pride ourselves on being a venue where children and adults alike can learn something they didn’t know before.  We are a Children’s University Learning Provider as our Museum based worksheet trails have received accreditation for Children’s University hours.

These can be accessed at all times and if you have completed the ones on show then a volunteer is usually on hand to find you another one on a different theme.

The family Discovery Days that we run during the school holidays (Tuesday and Thursdays) are also accredited hours, so decorating a crown and learning about the Royal forest, or making a cardboard tube animal and learning its place in the New Forest habitats can all count.

Now the New Forest Heritage Centre has signed up to #GetKidsOutLearning.

Research shows that children who are more engaged outside school can better maintain their levels of understanding.  What better way for young people learn outside school, than to get out and about visiting places to inspire their young minds? (https://tutorful.co.uk/get-kids-out-learning)

The great outdoors is marvellous place for learning but Museums and Galleries have their place too.  In fact I can remember as a child my mother and I would always visit at least one museum in every location we went to.  Never one for being boring my mother would always find the buttons to push, the doors to open and quiz sheets were always a source of healthy competition.  I hope that families who come to the New Forest Heritage Centre can have the same fun experiences I did a child.  Who knows it may lead to a career choice!